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Announcements
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Corner Garden Highlights - Spring 2015 by Becky Pelton

Hereís a list of what we are growing and who planted it:
  1. Brussel Sprouts were planted inside by first and fourth grade students and later transplanted to garden by second and third grade students.
  1. Carrots were carefully planted in the garden by fourth grade students.
  1. Cherry tomatoes were started inside by pre K students and transplanted to the garden by Syana and Mr. Koehring. We planted them inside cages for support.
  1. Garlic was planted in the fall by fourth grade students. Itís looking great. We are waiting for the scapes to harvest.
  1. Potatoes were planted by pre k students plus volunteers from grades one to three.
  1. Radishes and turnips were planted directly in the garden at the end of April by pre k, first grade and fourth grade students. They were harvested by end of the school year by pre k, first grade and fourth grade students.
  1. Rhubarb was harvested by pre k students and fourth grade students.
  1. Squash was planted on hills by second and third grade students. The best part was creating the hills for the squash to climb.
  1. Sunflowers were planted by kindergarten students.

Other garden tasks completed by elementary students: weeding, tilling, sampling perennial herbs such as chives and mint


Files
 2013 Garden Wishlist.docx
This is a list of items we need for the garden.
 Companion planting.doc
Companion planting probably began when early gardeners noticed that some plants seemed to grow best when planted next to certain other plants. There is some science to back up this lore, but many still consider companion planting to be mostly unproven. Of course, gardeners can always try it to see if it works!
 corner garden goals.doc
1. Children will begin to understand where their food comes from and be a part of the physical process of growing and harvesting food.
2. Children will gain a sense of the life cycle of plants and insects and the interconnectedness of all organisms.
3. Spending time in the garden will allow children to develop a strong connection to the natural world, and a future interest in protecting it.
 Food_Day_Newspaper.pdf
Food should be healthy. Affordable. And produced with care for the environment; the women and men who grow, harvest, and serve it; and farm animals. But too often, our food system puts those
ideals out of reach. Our diets often cause more harm than good for ourselves and our environment, and many people donít have the
money to eat a healthy diet. Thatís where Food Day comes in. Food Day is a nationwide celebration on October 24th and a movement toward healthy, affordable, and sustainable food. Food Day is a grassroots campaign to help solve food-related problems in our homes, on our farms, in our schools, and in our communities. Together we can build better food policies and a stronger, more united food movement. Join the movement thatís changing the way America eats ó visit FoodDay.org!
 garden committee mtg 5-12-11.doc.docx
Garden Committee minutes from 5/21/11
 may newsletter.doc.docx
May 2011 LLCS newsletter entry
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